Networking & Support

Anyone who contacts us can find someone local or at a distance to help and encourage her or him. After 20 years, we have a worldwide network that we use to link children, teens and others to a reputable group or individual. Check Our Supporters (under About Us above) and you’ll realize we have a wide net that can supply what you need.

You can tap into our network for inspiration and help. Online, by phone, or in person, there are people who have your best interests as a primary concern.

Caged Bird Sings* Project
*Used with permission of Dr. Maya Angelou

Saffi_in_blue__5_SAFFI

Girls Speak Out is a positive place to recover hope.
— Sandra L. Bloom, M.D.
author of Creating Sanctuary and Violence and Bearing Witness

Girls Speak Out worked with MAdEA, a local nonprofit in Dar esSaleem, Tanzania, training women to deliver workshops–and change lives. Soon after, a group of girls in Tanzania experienced Girls Speak Out with a facilitator from Canada, one of the girls, age 7 years old (see above), was kidnapped on her way to school. We joined with local media and worked with agencies that support children worldwide to help return her. A miracle happened: her kidnappers saw her picture on TV and dropped her at a bus stop for fear of being recognized. They were human sex traffickers. By the way, Saffi agreed to let us use her picture and name to help tell this story and prevent other girls and boys from being traumatized. See http://womensenews.org/story/crime-policylegislation/080522/tanzanias-missing-girls-rarely-raise-murmur#.VIYCp3ZBFUE

The Caged Bird Sings Project was created and piloted in multiple settings including juvenile detention centers in northern California, in Harlem Hospital in New York City, in Kenya and villages in India.

We named our campaign to help girls and boys in extreme circumstances The Caged Bird Sings Project. CONTACT US if you need this kind of assistance.

The extreme circumstances the Caged Bird Sings Project  address include:
  • Violence and trauma including kidnapping and home confinement
  • Breast Ironing (a practice affecting 1 in 4 girls in Cameroon)
  • Poverty
  • Trafficking
  • Hunger
  • Sexual and emotional abuse/neglect
  • HIV/AIDS/health crisis
  • Drug abuse
  • Isolation
  • Incarceration
  • Child prostitution and slavery
  • Unequal access to an education
  • Homelessness
  • Addictions
  • Female genital mutilation
  • Armed conflict /child soldiers
  • Child labor/servitiude

It means so much to me that women are working so hard for us.
–Norrel, 8, Kenya